Tribeca Film Fest

stories from the Tribeca Film Festival

Presenting the Youngest Director in Tribeca Film Festival History

For most people, junior year of high school consists of hustling to maintain their GPA, gearing up for college applications, hanging out with friends and dreaming about prom. Phillip Youmans was instead writing a...

‘Scheme Birds’ Is a Scottish Story Long Overdue

“Maggie Thatcher took the steel industry from Scotland and Ireland, gave it to England.”  Twenty-one-year-old Gemma sums up the history of her sleepy Scottish hometown as documentary “Scheme Birds” gets its bearings. She is...

Tribeca 2018: ‘Bobby Kennedy for President:’ A Glossy Tribute

Charming. Young. Energetic. For many Americans in the 1960s, the Kennedy family embodied the idea of a newer, stronger country. Unfortunately, these hopes were cut short when John F. Kennedy and his brother Robert...

Tribeca 2018: ‘Maine’ Lacks a Main Event

“Maine” is a film lost in the wilderness. The second feature from director Matthew Brown attempts to shift his filmmaking from simple indie material to accessible art through a narrative recalling something not unlike...

Tribeca 2018: A Complex Examination of Grief in ‘To Dust’

A woman off-camera flatlines in her hospital bed. Shmuel’s wife is dead. This is how Shawn Snyder’s film, “To Dust,” which had its world premiere on April 23 and won the Tribeca Film Festival’s...

Tribeca 2018: ‘Jellyfish’ Is a Valiant First Effort for James Gardner

If one were to only judge James Gardner’s feature debut “Jellyfish” on its synopsis, their initial assumptions may betray them. The film’s dramatic elements overshadow its attempt to be comedic, but prove Gardner’s potential...

Tribeca 2018: Comedy and Trauma and ‘All About Nina’

NYU alumna (Tisch ’98) Eva Vives’ newest film “All About Nina,” which premiered at Tribeca Film Festival on April 22, blends comedy, drama and romance, but if you are watching just for the laughs,...

Tribeca 2018: ‘The Night Eats the World’ Is A Great Zombie Movie

With “The Walking Dead” entering its ninth season on AMC, the zombie trend in pop culture has started to feel a little less undead and a little more dead-dead. But with Dominique Rocher’s new...

Tribeca 2018: Swedish Film ‘Amateurs’ Is a Little Amateur

Film is a medium that can speak about the world in ways other forms of art cannot. Combining visual, auditory and narrative elements, movies bring critical stories to life and make powerful statements about...

Tribeca 2018: ‘Duck Butter’ Is Experimental Intimacy

Bold, beautiful and absurd: Everything Miguel Arteta’s dramedy “Duck Butter,” which premiered at Tribeca Film Festival on Friday, April 20, aspires to be and what it mostly achieves as well. Driven by naturalistic performances,...

Tribeca 2017: ‘Elian’ Recounts the U.S.-Cuba Showdown Over a 5-Year-Old Boy

For those unaware of the story, Tim Golden and Ross McDonald’s “Elian” is likely to be startling. The documentary, which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival last weekend, depicts the case of Elian Gonzalez,...

Tribeca 2017: Jon Hamm, Jenny Slate Can’t Save ‘Aardvark’

Narrative films at the Tribeca Film Festival tend to get a bad reputation. On occasion, movies debuting with bigger stars will even be looked upon as rejects from other festivals. As with all generalizations,...
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