National Academy of Medicine Elects NYU Professor

Alesha Bradford
Professor and NYU Langone doctor Olugbenga Ogedegbe was elected to the National Academy of Medicine.

On Oct. 16, NYU Doctor and Professor Olugbenga Ogedegbe was announced as one of 70 other doctors and scientists to be elected into the National Academy of Medicine. This independent organization works toward addressing needs in health, medicine and government policies.  

NAM elects no more than 70 regular members and 10 international members a year. Only those with the most experience and achievement in the fields of health and medicine would be considered.

Ogedegbe holds multiple positions in various NYU departments, including the Department of Population Health, Department of Medicine, Division of Health & Behavior and Center for Healthful Behavior Change. His interests and research focus on chronic disease, cardiovascular risk reduction, health disparity research and minority health research.

Ogedegbe explained what it meant to be a member of NAM and what responsibilities members of the organization have toward endorsing health and science.

“The National Academy was mandated by Congress — I believe in the 70s — to help advise them on issues on science and arts,” Ogedegbe said. “So, that means I will have to work on behalf of academics to address any sort of issues which concern the medical sciences or health and social sciences. It’s a big deal for scientists.”

By working alongside other high-caliber doctors, engineers and scientists, Ogedegbe will have the opportunity to share research and broaden his knowledge in his field.

“[Working with NAM] allows me to have a broader platform to advance some of my interests and research. Ogedegbe said. “There’s no monetary interest in this award. It’s just an honor to be among colleagues who are highly esteemed.”

Other than these opportunities, being a member of NAM doesn’t provide Ogedegbe with research grants. However, it has its own hidden benefits of working among the world’s most brilliant researchers to address current health issues in the international community.  

For Ogedegbe, however, being recognized by NAM is already a great honor in itself.

“I have the highest honor of service that physicians or scientists in general can achieve.” he said.

Email Alesha Bradford at [email protected] 

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1 COMMENT

  1. God determines our gifts.
    Such a wonderful present to be honored by one’s peers. Especially, in such a precious area as health, the benefits can become global and rebirth of a people can occur. The area of Preventive Health is critical to a nation’s productivity, dependent on government financial involvement in the general public.

    Thank you for developing your gifts to share with the world, Prof. Ogedegbe.

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